We must Pick up the Cross!

I wanted to share some healthy dialogue between myself and a protestant colleague here at work, in regards to the election of our new Holy Father, Francis. This dialogue basically came from a recent article that was published entitled, ” From a Fellow Jesuit: Why the Pope Must be Martyr”, which I posted earlier today (http://www.catholicpio.com/2013/03/the-pope-martyr.html).  The below comment was the reply from this Protestant gentleman, and I think it warrants not only healthy dialogue  but it gives us the Protestant brothers and sisters perspective on the current state of our Church.

“I concur that the church (Christian churches all) must not bend in the wind of popularity but must speak out for the never-changing moral foundation that God innately provided us.  I do worry that, in this case, the influential Catholic church is under pressure to fix its diminishing membership by becoming more hip and popular and, as a result, could result in a dilution of God’s message.  I pray that this is not the case and I, indeed, am cheering for the church and the new Pope.”


I agree to an extent to this perspective, or at least understand it- but I really do feel the Holy Spirit was at work in selection of this Pope, and not just a ploy from our Church to stop the diminishing membership.  His humility and care for the poor is proven, and I think the Cardinals were thinking that as well.  Its time to rebuild the church as his namesake did, cutting down the empire like status and affluence that the Church in Rome has displayed  in the eyes of the Protestants, all these many years.  Humility is the closest thing to being Holy, and I think the new Holy Father exemplifies this in many ways based off his ministry and actions in the past in Buenos Aires.  Our Pope must always be a martyr.  Already the liberal blogs and leftists are bashing his selection and views on homosexual rights and unions.  Many hypothesize that the third secret of Fatima showed that from the top down, even within our Church, the moral aptitude and popularity sway and acceptance of sin from our modern times would spark the coming of the end of days.  We need a man like Francis, a man that is willing to carry the weight and burden of the Cross, not willing to bow down to popular thought and ideas, but defend the word of God from the popularity and acceptance of mortal sin.  The Catholic Church should not conform to the populous view- the populous view should conform to the ideals of the Christ’s Church.  Even Christ said to Peter Truly, truly, I say to you, when you were young, you fastened your own belt and walked where you would; but when you are old, you will stretch out your hands, and another will fasten your belt for you and carry you where you do not wish to go” (John 21:18).   With this He was telling Peter, and all those after him, what he must do for the sake of His Church.   I am thankful to the Holy Spirit that we appear to have a man that truly will exemplify Christ’s teachings here on earth.  Already in his first days he has begun to show this, and I know that it will continue.  In his first homily he stated that we must not be afraid to carry the Cross, always cognizant of what it represents.  In this time of new evangelization, we must pick up Christ’s Cross, and defiantly reject the populous sway towards sin.  We must not be afraid to by martyrs, we must stand for Christ, and pray for our salvation in these times of sin.  We must be willing to not be afraid to say what is right, when all others try to combat you for rights that are not theirs, but gifts of God’s grace from the eternal kingdom.  

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